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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
, i learned on the campaign trail. there's always a winner and loser. the political environment just like the business world, is highly competitive. with every campaign season there's always a new crop of start-ups. innovation incubators. and so, i guess the campaign is a little bit of an entrepreneurial showcase. i think a lot of us think we see these ads and i guess keeping the campaign is disliked a big marketing machine that spits out the ads we see on tv and the candidates are sending mail to us an e-mail to our in box and the phone calls and so forth. but if you peel back the curtain, you might find something. a something difference you find a very complex, highly detailed operation. there's a million things happening at once. there are things happening around the candidates, there are things happening around the headquarters operations, things happening in field offices. everything from where a candidate will stay, who will stand with the candidates, what site he should choose for that and how many people should come to the event and right down to the helium in the balloons an
? alternative fuel for our cars? did you think of hope for the environment, or food, clothing, shelter? we do. weyerhaeuser. growing ideas. >> mr. president, you are entitled to your own airplane and house, but not to your own facts. >> the first presidential debate, around 12 mitt romney. >> it is arithmetic. >> where was the president's fastball? >> i felt he should of been more aggressive. >> join the president on them stage, the beleaguered middle class. >> the middle class are getting crushed. >> that is what joe biden says. >> how they can justify raising taxes on the middle-class who have been buried the last four years. >> to joe biden. no, don't boo. he is the best thing we have got going, guys. >> it was the biggest brownson's encore. i read that in a column friday morning. on the cover 25th, 1415 on christmas day at parkton corps, king henry led his army to victory. charles the six was mentally incapacitated at the time of battle. that is as far as i want to take that one. agincourt? >> yes, you were there, as i recall. you covered it for the daily frog. it was quite a rout. when i
you could even say we're a little bit ambitious. right. you come in to the environment, many people came in without a job. they were volunteers and want to get a job. some people -- they want to get noticed by the right people. and they, you know, and you have people who have been hired who want maybe more responsibility. right than they probably traditional in their job. and the department heads who are racing against each other maybe to get a little more budget than the other and get a little more turf than the others and you might expect. you have the thing going on it's a chaotic time. you need to get control of this. because, you know, in this environment, where there no sort of norms, it's like building -- it is like building a village from scratch. everybody comes to a place with no rules or enormous, no structures, right, it's like the wild west. and not everybody, you know, some people who, you know, have their own tactics for getting their own way. right. sometimes even good people lose control of the inner jerks. it's a problem early in the campaign. we all have them. com
you reconcile that with your voting record? >> i have a very strong record on the environment in the united states senate. [laughter] i have a record where i voted for the superfund legislation. i have a record where i voted against my president on the override of the clean water act. i have voted for the major pieces of environmental legislation that have come down and been voted on in the united states senate. this administration and i support this administration and its environmental efforts has moved in the area for the first time to deal with the ozone problem. we now have an international treaty, the treaty that is commonly referred to as the montreal treaty. for the first time we are talking about the impact of co2 to the ozone layer. that's progress with the environment. we are committed to the environment. i take my children hiking and fishing, walking in the woods, in the wilderness. believe me, we have a commit to preserving the environment. you bring up the environment, you can't help but think about the environmental policy of the governor of massachusetts. he tal
environment. you can spread by around but let's face it, in the negotiations over the past year or so, the single biggest obstacle -- optical has been republican on willingness to move significantly on taxes. if they moved on taxes, i think democrats, a number of them including the president, will move on spending and we can have a primary agreement and the lame duck session. if not, i think we go into january. what happens if we do? think of 1995. we have a government shut down. newt gingrich/bill clinton -- once the government shut down, the pressure on both sides was so intense. the pressure if we go into january will be far greater because the economic consequences and the market consequences are more significant. i think it is inconceivable that if we go into january, there won't be a solution in january or early february at the latest. there has to be a settlement, somebody will have to blink, probably both sides. i talk a little bit to people in financial markets in the york. i would think the market would react to all of this. if there is a deal in a few weeks and any deal cle
, in a controlled environment where he's had a lot of time to practice, where he's had an opportunity to sort of think a lot about what he wants to say and frame his arguments and he went out and delivered. but now he's going to have to go out there and defend those arguments, going to have to go out on the stump and talk to people, talk to reporters. again, articulate the vision that john was talking about which he's been unable to do. we'll see if he's able to take that performance out of a controlled environment and i think the onus is on the president as well. he certainly came out swinging yesterday and did a lot of things people wished he had done at the debate on wednesday night, but he's going to have to make the same argument. >> well, the next two debates will be fascinating, as will the vp debate. for now, thank you both very much. >>> coming up, education was a key part of the debate the other night but can you save our schools? we meet the man who is trying to do that. bars. hmm? i just wanted you to eat more fiber. chewy, oatie, gooeyness... and fraudulence. i'm in deep, babe. y
? so you come into this environment. many people came in without a job. they're just volunteers and they want to get a job. some people, so they want to get noticed by the right people. and they, you know, and you have people who have been hired who want maybe more responsibility, right, and they probably traditional in their job. you have department heads who are racing against each other to maybe get a little more budget than the other and get a little more turf than the others than you might expect. you have this thing going on where it is a very chaotic time and you really need to get control of this because in this environment where there are no sort of norms, it is like building a village from scratch where everybody comes to a place with no rules, no norms, no structures, right? it's like the wild west and not everybody, you know, some people who, you know, have their own tactics for getting their own way, right? sometimes even good people lose control of their inner jerks. that is a problem early in the campaign, right? we all have them, come on. so you throw an elbow at
environment. >> the capstone concept forward says the world is trending towards greater stability, yet it says the world is potentially more dangerous than ever. how will the stability overcome the threat? >> well, you know, when people ask me about afghanistan, the first thing i normally tell them is it's possible for violence and progress to coexist in places like afghanistan. i'd say the same thing about the paradox of stability and threat. they coexist. so i've talked about a security paradox which is violence is at an evolutionary low. and it is, except that the capabilities to impart violence are in the hands of people who heretofore wouldn't have had access to them. so you have a paradox of feeling as though the world is -- this is kind of the tom friedman the world is flat and connected and, therefore, is less likely to fight each other. maybe. but there's also the other school of thought that says it's in the unconnected parts of our globe where violence will be both more prevalent, but also more violent because the instruments of violence are more available now than they've ever been
to bring vocational education back to the schools. we need to start creating an environment in our schools where the child is not on an educational path for college, they are on the path for vocational training and have a chance to have a solid life with education. we need to empower classrooms and redirect some of the dollars out of the administration in the classroom. >> thank you for the question. other than public safety, there is nothing that the state does that is more important than educating our kids. we have made great progress in a recent years. graduation rates are up, test scores are up. but we have a long way to go. 20% of our schools got a great of -- grade of c or lower. there is nothing that can't be fixed if we give parents more choices and the teachers more freedom to teach. i agree with my competitors and say that in addition to the aspect of our road map, that called for greater emphasis on math and reading, i think the time has come when the priority for every high school in indiana again, we lay out a road map. >> thirty second rebuttals. >> any changes will have to
. and an incredible, beautiful environment and also in an interesting election season to say the least. our first award for the evening -- before we get to that, i have to start it was a joke. can i start out with a joke? joe biden. sorry, that's the joke. [applause] followed by another joke, nancy pelosi. sorry. as an ardent practicing catholic. sorry. i was told by friends of "saturday night live" but i do the best nancy pelosi impersonation, but i'm still waiting for that bet they are going to me and "saturday night live." he seemed to avoid goofy liberal spirits on the republicans they do over there. our first award to the evening is the obama got some award. i can't believe i'm actually saying that. troubling. for about 25 years come in the media research center has been documenting every idiocy we know from the media as they celebrate one liberal hero after another. and let me just say, the people we are going to be talking about, they love politicians who want to raise your taxes, right? they love politicians who want to expand the nanny state and are going to check all the boxes here. the
the environment and something that was set in the debate last week. the president had the lead on energy and he said we were dealing now more than ever for gas and oil and he's right. then mr. romney came back with our bottle saying, mr. president, are drilling more for gas and oil, but it's not due to your policy. then he went on to say that because we are not drilling on federal and. why the president did not jump on that, i don't know. all the president would have to have said, was, mr. romney, do you think the american public would condone drilling in yellowstone? do you think the american public would condone drilling in yosemite? i just sat back from fly-fishing in montana and i was on federal land fly-fishing. i was on federal land where nothing is going on and i enjoyed that. i don't want to be fly-fishing next to an oil well or fracking liquid that is stored in pits that is poisonous. i just don't understand mr. romney saying we should be drilling like crazy on federal land. that just goes to show how he is uneducated about the circle of life in the natural environments. that's all i h
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and very fast changing environment. so, i am grateful to all of you for coming and look forward to our discussion and at this point i would like to invite shibley telhami to the podium to present the poll. >> thanks a lot, tammie. it's always great to be here. i'm going to just present not the whole thing but some of the findings so we can get on with the conversation i will present a highlight. i just want to give you a little bit of a picture about this particular poll. it was conducted by knowledge networks sample of 737 that is designed to be a national representative in an internet panel. the methodology is described in the information that we will put all and is also available online. i also want to say that it's really my pleasure and honor to partner to the sinnott program at the university of maryland, and a program for policy international policy attitudes and particularly my colleague, steve coll, who has a recent book published by brookings about feeling betrayed about muslim attitudes which is an excellent book but also the fact the we did the september 27 to october 2nd w
a meritorious environment, right? we're already past a place where race is like the thumb on the scale, right? >> i guess i would put it differently. i would say it's not a rigid quota. it can operate as a plus factor, but to some people would be viewed as a thumb on the scale. the brief that was sort of moving to me in looking at the case going -- o the fisher going up to the supreme court, oral arguments are on wednesday, is a brief written by deans of harvard and yale. notice that harvard and yale are where anine of the justices graduated. when we do admissions, we do a holistic merit-based analysis. if we build a diverse class, racial diversity is one component of that excellence. don't take our word for it. go to mckenzie and mckenzie has done amazing consulting work with fortune 500. again, we can have queasiness about whether or not that's a metric, whether it's a social justice issue, engaging in mediation rather than this is good for the bottom line. going back to the 2003 case, the briefs moving to sandra day o'connor, it was now being swapped out by alito which is why many are worr
the ballot measures in 34 states, abortion rights, same sex marriage, the environment, legalizing marijuana, everything is on these ballots so everybody has to not just do the candidates, they have to vote on the ballot issues. and by the way, on that little gender gap, do not worry, there is a genre gap. it's been there every time since 1980. and it is the voice -- we got the woman's vote but for so long they said they vote but all they do is vote according to men's pocketbook. no, that was wrong when i was taught it in my political science classes and it's very wrong now. women are voting their own interest on medicaid, family planning, reproductive rights. i could go on. and that measure -- when you hear that it's disappeared, don't believe that. it has not disappeared. it is the difference between men and women's votes and it's measureable. and it's based not on good looks but on positions on issues. and it will be there, it is there. and always when you hear all these polls, look at the combination of how many democrats they're putting in, how many young people, how many people are col
and big oil companies, the generics began to spread. instead of being in a neutral environment, we were up 1, 2, 3, and when todd aiken express those horrific thoughts about legitimacy to forms of rape, the generics widened even more. when the republican or romping in the sea of galilee, the generics spread even more. these people have breweries that would end of medicare to fund -- these people have priorities that would end medicare. in august, the nbc/ "wall street journal"generic said it was up four. there is a direct correlation between generics and our ability to win back the house and right now is going in the right direction. host: you could hear more from that interview tomorrow at 10:00 in the morning on this network. vincent from detroit, michigan, good morning. caller: good morning, i started new job monday. host: congratulations. caller: i was previously working part-time in retail but prior to that i was in the health field and the hospital were that close. i was out of work for eight months and applied for hundreds of jobs. i just got a job so i believe the economy is gettin
did, it really comes out very powerful. you can't control the environment in the way that you could before. >> no. and we remember with hillary clinton, they were saying that obama didn't look up, but he didn't look up in that debate with hillary clinton. >> right. >> again, that is who he is. i think we are totally for getting that. >> not only that, but i think we're also for getting that both of these men, to your point, they were who they always have been, even in governing. barack obama has infuriated his own base because of this perception that he doesn't fight hard enough. >> recurrent theme. >> it's a recurrent theme. with mitt romney the recurrent theme among republicans, the reason he doesn't have a lot of frentsds in his party is the idea that he's a vicious debater. newt gingrich called him a liar in which he demolished supposedly the best debater in the republican party and he is known to be a flip-flopper. what did he do in that debate, he flip-flopped. everybody played the type. >> dedrick's point is smart about mitt romney in some ways was the beneficiary of lowered
environment but an energy policy that creates 5 million new jobs, a foreign policy that ends this war in iraq, a foreign policy that goes after the one mission the american public gave the president after 9/11, to get and capture or kill bin laden and to eliminate al qaeda. a policy that would in fact engage our allies in making sure that we knew we were acting on the same page and not dictating. and a policy that would reject the bush doctrine of preemption and regime change and replace it with a doctrine of prevention and cooperation and, ladies and gentlemen, this is the biggest ticket item that we have in this election. this is the most important election you will ever, ever have voted in, any of you, since 1932. and there's such stark differences, i would follow through on barack's policies because in essence, i agree with every major initiative he is suggesting. >> governor. >> and heaven forbid, yes, that would ever happen, no matter how this ends up, that that would ever happen with either party. as for disagreeing with john mccain and how our administration would work, what do you ex
. >> how hard is it in the hollywood environment that exists today, to put like real events that impact people's lives and havism pacted people's lives on the screen as opposed to the industry. how hard is it to get those out? >> i think most of the money is made in superhero ske r sequels. so in zradramas, you get on andd on and cable does great jobs, so some of those folks are staying home. and history itself is not a good movie. history is history. and best studied as such, i think. or people who write about it, for example. movies need to have drama. >> i'll tell you that opening scene brings you there, and i don't know because i watched it so closely as a child, but you are drawn into it. you feel like you are in there with them and you don't get out until the movie's over. it's amazing. i don't know how you did that in this day and age because movies are hard to get torques sell to -- >> the inspiration for that was and i don't liken myself to stephen spielberg, one of the great masters. saving private ryan, it starts the movie and pulls you in with that sequence, with revolutioni
environment other than giving money? >> that's how. >> has just giving money. >> that's it. >> money is one kind of speech. i was asked a similar question at a gathering recently and i said look, barack obama has shown there's a second model for politicians. you can build a base of small donors and as brad points out it can be a robust, even unlimited spending. >> any other thoughts on how much impact citizens have over the state of play? >> we are and what appear the five of us because we are in the more influential group of citizens. we have influence without having to give money. that's one of the things i point out, it went quick anecdote. when i was at the fec, used to coming to washington to spend a week or two in the summer, and the attacks of the department of agriculture. and i remember one year they were creating a debate topic and they would have these debates on campaign finance. i looked at the resolution being introduced to regulate campaign finance. the students thought that the regulation, their proposal would create more regulation than the current system had. but actually
and a cleaner environment but an energy policy that creates 5 million new jobs. a foreign policy that ends this war in iraq. a foreign policy that goes after the one mission the american public gave the president after 9/11, to get and capture or kill bin laden. and to eliminate al qaeda. a policy that would, in fact, engage our allies in making sure that we knew we were acting on the same page and not dictating. and a policy that would reject the bush doctrine of preemption and regime change and replace it with the doctrine of prevention and cooperation, and ladies and gentlemen, this is the biggest ticket item we have in this election, the most important election you will ever, ever have voted in since 1932. and we are such stark differences. i would follow through on barack's policies to get in essence i agree with everything, every major initiative he has suggested. >> moderator: governor. palin: and heaven forbid yes, that that would ever happen. no matter how this ends up, that that would ever happen with either party. as for disagreeing with john mccain and how our administration wo
has strength in america with this focus on budget, education, and the environment. and the white house, he served as director of the office of management meant but-management budget. he helped make america stronger. at the central intelligence agency, he had notable results disrupting and defeating terror networks. as the secretary of defense, he has struck a balance as a forceful advocate for efficiencies while also standing resolute in favor of an adequately funded military. i am pleased to bestow upon him that 2011 award for upstanding american and contributions to the country. secretary panetta. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. thank you so much for this wonderful evening and the chance to enjoy some terrific company and be able to express my deepest gratitude to this organization for all of the great things that it does on behalf of those that serve in our military. my greatest thanks for your kind remarks and leadership. i accept this award not so much for myself, but on behalf of the men and women in uniform who are putting their lives on the line every night, every
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)

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